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Messages - KWKloeber

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 227
1
Main Message Board / Re: water in bilge
« on: Today at 11:11:18 AM »
Becki
The black hose (w/a check valve on it) is for your bilge pump discharge and the used-to-be white hose is for the emergency bilge pump (as Ron had described.)

2
Main Message Board / Re: Odd Stuffing Box Line Placement
« on: Today at 10:02:59 AM »
Tim

Your burb setup is 5/8" x 5/8" x ?
The head supply tee you need is what size hoses and threads onto what size?

3
Main Message Board / Re: 160 thermostat vrs 180
« on: Today at 09:32:59 AM »
Glenn

Yes (you are missing the link.)

The elbow joint is connected to the arm bone.  Or in this case, the seawater injection wye @ the muffler and Hx seawater side are connected (thermally) to the engine coolant loop.  The cooler the engine coolant, the cooler the seawater after the Hx.  Or conversely, hotter coolant causes hotter seawater to precipitate out and deposit the gunk at places we don't want it to end up.

It's another of those compromises we all read about re: "boating."  Controlling one negative can lead to another negative and it becomes a teeter-totter.

It's kinda strange that some owners have no problem at all with deposits and some have had near-totally blocked injection wyes, presumably the same seawater salt content and same Tstat.  Maybe seawater temp is the controlling factor?

4
Main Message Board / Re: water in bilge
« on: Today at 09:21:08 AM »
becki they aren't displaying on the website and when I download/view them I get a "damaged file" error.

5
Main Message Board / Re: 160 thermostat vrs 180
« on: October 18, 2019, 10:57:24 PM »
Additionally - see Page 2 of Universal's original M25 Service Manual
ENGINE OPERATING TEMPERATURE  1750 to 1900

I don't see why Kubota (the manual was copied from Kb's engine manual) would design them to run in that temp range unless there was a reason for it.  Maybe they just had to "pick something" and 180 it was?

6
Main Message Board / Re: 160 thermostat vrs 180
« on: October 18, 2019, 09:08:05 PM »
Ken : Let me ask you this question? : What should/would be the notable difference in engine performance between the 160F and the 180F thermostat????    :?

Ron

Ahhh redirection with an irrelevant question (irrelevant whether there is or is not a difference that can be "felt" by the driver)  The point is, how can you state that you see no difference between coffee at 160 and 180 when all you ever drank is coffee at 160?

But to your question -- it has been my understanding (from surveyors, truckers, diesel mechanics) that diesels "run better", are "more efficient" at a higher temp. I don't have data or a white paper to back that up, just 3rd-hand.  We know that a diesel can't get to proper operating temp unless under load -- and also they "run better" under high load (ask any trucker.) 
I suppose there's different meanings to "run better" and "efficient" -- but a diesel needs to be hotter (again, just my understanding) to prevent incomplete combustion (dunno - maybe high emissions and soot and pollution and raw fuel out the exhaust?) and issues in the engine itself (maybe carbon build-up from incomplete combustion?).

I also go by what Kubota recommends/supplies for these engines (but Wb installs a 160 (to reduce precipitation issues in saltwater.))

From the original M25 Service Manual talking about our "radiator" (Universal hadn't removed the tractor references): 
Thermostat opening temperature - Approx. 82C (180 F)

So I'll ask a question - Why would Kubota design the engine to operate at 180?  Just coincidence and it could be 160 or 180?  Maybe.

7
Main Message Board / Re: 160 thermostat vrs 180
« on: October 18, 2019, 12:58:54 AM »
Jim : I was in fresh water 1/2 the time and salt water the other half for 15 years.  The 160F is what was always was in there (& still is) with no overheating.  Never noted the difference in performance!!

A thought

Ron:  Non conprendo, senor. 

How can you compare (a difference in) performance of the diesel if you never ran the 180F TStat?

-k

8
Main Message Board / Re: water in bilge
« on: October 17, 2019, 09:02:16 PM »

a line of paper towel


becki, as well, another trick is to sprinkle baby powder on the hull in suspect locations or draw lines using sidewalk chalk (as a telltale as to where unwanted water flows across locations.)

9
Main Message Board / Re: Fuel Pump 101 UPDATE and CRITICAL QUESTION
« on: October 17, 2019, 08:01:25 PM »
QUESTION ANSWERED!
Received today from a brethren:


Today I spoke with the technical expert at Facet/Purolator regarding my new fuel pump (model MMDW412496).
He told me that the old Facet pumps did slow down in the clicking rate as the system became pressurized (something we on this listserve knew).  In 1996, the circuit board in the fuel pump was changed, and that now in models produced since then the pump runs continuously, even when the system is fully pressurized. 
As a consequence, the clicking remains at a high rate all the time. 
If one listens carefully, one can notice a change in the sound quality as pressurization occurs, but the clicking rate itself doesn't change.

Bob


Cheers
Ken

10
Main Message Board / Re: Odd Stuffing Box Line Placement
« on: October 17, 2019, 07:49:49 PM »
Tim

I don't have a dripless and don't winterize using antifreeze so I probably shouldn't speak to that.

An unsolicited comment on the install - if that's yellow brass tee, barbs - note that yellow brass isn't approved for raw water use.  Tho, being on freshwater would be a mitigating factor.  Red brass is "ok", bronze or maerlon (or marleon-like) would be best. 
And all below-waterline, or potentially siphoning raw water, hoses should be double-clamped (best is to use ABA or AWAB type clamps.)

-k

11
Main Message Board / Re: Fuel Pump 101 UPDATE and CRITICAL QUESTION
« on: October 16, 2019, 04:52:43 PM »
Thanks Ron!
That explains the one nagging question about the new pumps. Im thinking maybe the guy who has the constant fast ticking has a vac leak.

12
Main Message Board / Re: Odd Stuffing Box Line Placement
« on: October 15, 2019, 09:07:14 PM »
Tim

On sailboat you don't need to plumb a water supply to the dripless seal.  On a powerboat the dripless needs to be watered, otherwise it can burn up.  Or if a sailboat has a bearing in the shaft log then it too needs to have water supplied to the dripless.

Typically just a vent line is run on certerline to above the waterline as you describe.

There's no harm watering the dripless but not necessary (belt and suspenders?) but the Hx anode should remain in place -- so it's better to tee off a seawater hose rather than watering it via from the anode port.


13
Main Message Board / Re: Fuel Pump 101 UPDATE and CRITICAL QUESTION
« on: October 15, 2019, 05:27:30 PM »
For anyone who has replaced the oem lift pump with a new "electronic/solid state" Facet -- have you noticed whether the new pump continues to click away at the same quick pace after (presumably) the fuel delivery has been pressurized (ie, key on, engine off, bypass closed.) 

The oem would slow down to a near stop, but someone else reported that the replacement Facet (aka Purolator) continues to click away at the same quick pace no matter what.

Has anyone specifically noticed that?

tia

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