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 1 
 on: Today at 06:48:24 AM 
Started by Robert Mann - Last post by Breakin Away
I did a similar, but much smaller, repair around a chainplate on my C250. I taped the bottom and filled the core from the top. Even for a small repair, I was concerned about overheating from the exotherm, so I decided to do it in a few thinner layers, waiting for the exotherm to kick off before doing the next layer. However, this led to concerns over amine blush, which would interfere with adhesion between the layers. Normal procedure is to grind and clean the amine blush between layers, but this is impossible inside the fiberglass sandwich, which required a blush-free epoxy chemistry. From prior work that I had done using West Systems epoxy, I knew that they have very severe, slick, slippery blush as part of their chemistry.

With that said, I'm just wondering what you guys think about these guys as an epoxy supplier. They're the guys that I used:

https://www.epoxyusa.com/category_s/3.htm

 2 
 on: Today at 03:35:05 AM 
Started by Hugh17 - Last post by Hugh17
Today's fiberglass backed vinyl floors offers a much improved option for laying vinyl floor covering. In decades past, vinyl flooring was backed with felt which meant the flooring would quickly curl upward making loose-laying installation undesirable. Another option was shrinking type vinyl which meant that perimeter adhering was required to keep the vinyl from contracting away from the walls and leaving an ugly gap. But, with the latest generation of fiberglass backed products, dimensional stability has been achieved so laying vinyl flooring is much like laying a rug.

My MK1 #299 is beautiful inside but dark. I've removed the teak & holly flooring from the galley and replaced with a nice non-patterned fiberglass backed vinyl. The finish and color appears to be a fine grained marble and it really adds a nice contrast to the darker floors and wood panels in the boat. I used the teak & holly panels for a template which provides for an almost perfect fit. The slight recessed area for the wooden teak & holly flooring keeps the vinyl from slipping and self trims the edges.

The new flooring can be cleaned in place or easily removed and cleaned on the dock if preferred. I usually remove the vinyl flooring when working on the engine just to protect it from nasty oil or grease spills. Of course I've saved the original teak & holly flooring to reinstall someday if preferred.

 3 
 on: Yesterday at 10:15:18 PM 
Started by Robert Mann - Last post by Robert Mann
Thanks Ken, the deepest point of the vee is about 10". I really can't tell the shape of the cavity accurately,  so putting wood in might leave a potential void.  I think adding unthickened resin first is a great idea to shore up the core, followed by a mix. I will take a look at 403.  I was debating between 406 and micro balloons, or a mix of both.  Colloidal silica and micro balloons was the mix recommendation from Fibreglass Coatings.

 4 
 on: Yesterday at 07:10:29 PM 
Started by Breakin Away - Last post by KWKloeber
I notice that a few manufacturers have a heavy-duty PG antifreeze recommended for diesels.  Cummins is one, Zerex another.
One reason I like the idea of PG is for the water heater.  If a pinhole develops, there's a slight chance that engine coolant can leach into the potable system (typically it would be the opposite direction.)  I don't know what concentration of EG would be toxic, but PG would be safer during a period until the leak is discovered.

Note that while OSHA lists PG as generally safe, at least four states list it as a hazardous substance, and Canada WHMIS classifies it as D3 (the same class as asbestos, mercury, saccharin.)   hmmmmmm..  Is pink stuff available in Canada for use in water systems?  Maybe someday we'll find it isn't as safe as we think for potable systems?

 5 
 on: Yesterday at 06:18:55 PM 
Started by Robert Mann - Last post by KWKloeber
Robert

I did a similar core damage repair.  Suggest you use poly tubing to extend the tip of the caulking tube to get unthickened resin deep into the void, or use a long (artist's) brush to thoroughly saturate/wet out all edges of the void before pumping in the mix.
I used to nearly always use 406 but once I tried 403, I universally use that for everything.  It has better adhesive properties, and is nearly as strong in compression as 406 (the repair isn't that large.)  It wets out SO MUCH easier than trying to mix in 406 (which I equate to trying to mix dandelion wisps into peanut butter.)  Microfibers mixes in so much more easily and quickly.

How deep does it go in the corner? Could you cut a wedge of marine plywood, butter it up and slip it into place?  Or alternately roll up a bunch of pieces of wetted-out fiberglass cloth or mat, and poke them into the hole using a dowel the height of the void?

 6 
 on: Yesterday at 03:05:49 PM 
Started by KWKloeber - Last post by KWKloeber
Advance auto has a limited time 25% online code that's good for marine starting, etc., batteries

discount code CTP3BX

 7 
 on: Yesterday at 11:46:34 AM 
Started by ChrisW - Last post by Ron Hill
ChrisW : You need to look in Critical Updates, WiKi & Mainsheet tech notes --- LOOK FOR Glow Plug Solenoid upgrade.

That way all the Hi amps needed to heat the glow plugs stay down at the engine and do not flow to the key switch thru its marginally sized wiring!!

Great articles in those Mainsheet tech notes in WiKi and Critical Upgrades!!!

A few thoughts

 8 
 on: Yesterday at 10:54:28 AM 
Started by ChrisW - Last post by KWKloeber
Chris

I found specs on the seadog switches and, interestingly, it's claimed to be 15a ignition and 30a ignition/start.  I never thought of seadog as the gold standard, as Cole Hersee is, but..... 
When you replaced your switch did the gauges work, or was there an issue from the get-go?  I wonder if the rating on the CH may be conservative or if the seadog overstated?

Manufacturers play all sorts of games (figures lie and liars figure.)  So I also wonder if the stated ratings are "contact make", "contact break" or "contact made" ..... we know it ought to be the lowest one, but........

If you use a "magneto" type ignition switch the I and S are not tied together, so when preheating ('start) the only current thru the contacts is the glow plugs (other loads are disconnected until the key goes back to the 'run' position.)  Both SD and CH should have that type.

 9 
 on: February 16, 2019, 08:18:55 PM 
Started by ChrisW - Last post by KWKloeber
"Please do not hesitate to" ask for clarifications!  We've got your back.  :D

The key switch you recommended says it is rated for 10 amps run and 5 amps start.  I don't have a DC ammeter that can handle over 10 amps.  So I had an extra inline fuse holder and wired it into the power wire to the key switch.  I put a 15 amp fuse in it.  Turning the key to preheat blew the fuse in one second.  You recommended putting in a 30 amp fuse, but can that key switch handle 30 amps?

I think I want to get rid of that engine mod you were talking about and power the glow plugs directly.  I don't trust it.  Do I just hook that grey wire that goes into the engine near where the fuel line goes in to the S terminal of the key switch?

Chris you ID'd one of the issues with the way CTY had Seaward configure some panels.  My M-25 panel is key off-->ON-->start (low amps) and preheat (higher amps) is a push-button.  Some M-25/XP panels were key off-->on, and PB preheat and PB start.  But, per Seaward, it changed the configuration over years because owners complained about start sequences -- took two hands instead of one.  I don't gettit, but that's why there are different configurations.

There's PB sws rated for 35 amps, but not a key sw that high.  That said, the start position is start+ignition. so 10+5=15a. 
 rated.  The glow plugs draw 6a x 3 = 18 amps (give or take.)  You might want to use the plastic case CH #850 sw, rated 15+5=20a in the start position.

All that said, the preheat relay mod should draw low amps and *should** not blow a 15a fuse.  I'm guessing maybe 2-3a for the coil on that relay?  So if you are pulling 15+, there's something wrong, either in the relay itself or in the wiring.

Yes.  To power the preheat w/o the relay, the white #10 wire goes directly to the #3 glow plug.  Besides being simpler, KISS, that way is a little easier on your glow plugs so they last longer (slightly less voltage than 13-14v direct from the battery.)  The "downside" (if you consider it one) is that longer preheat time (+10-15 seconds) is needed.

 10 
 on: February 16, 2019, 04:39:37 PM 
Started by ChrisW - Last post by ChrisW
"Please do not hesitate to" ask for clarifications!  We've got your back.  :D

The key switch you recommended says it is rated for 10 amps run and 5 amps start.  I don't have a DC ammeter that can handle over 10 amps.  So I had an extra inline fuse holder and wired it into the power wire to the key switch.  I put a 15 amp fuse in it.  Turning the key to preheat blew the fuse in one second.  You recommended putting in a 30 amp fuse, but can that key switch handle 30 amps?

I think I want to get rid of that engine mod you were talking about and power the glow plugs directly.  I don't trust it.  Do I just hook that grey wire that goes into the engine near where the fuel line goes in to the S terminal of the key switch?


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