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Author Topic: Atlantic Crossing  (Read 512 times)

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weseitz

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #15 on: July 20, 2020, 03:03:44 AM »

Hello again:
Thanks again for the remarks. As a credentialed sea captain, I've done a lot of offshore sailing in the Atlantic, Caribbean, Mediterranean, North Sea, Baltic, Biscay Bay and other somewhat treacherous seas, including several MAC races in the late 70s which can be very treacherous indeed. The crew has also crossed the Atlantic before. The smallest boat was a Sweden Yachts 370. The largest is a Hylas 70 (a button boat that is not real sailing). I will have four experienced crew on board including me. I will not go this year. I'm preparing and sailing the boat this year in the Baltic Sea to get to know it a bit. It needs work too.

Noah, correctly emphasized that the weather conditions going from Europe to Florida are the best in early November due to easterly trades. I'll go down the west coast of Europe to around the 20th parallel then head across in early November just like almost everyone. The weather forecaster I've used, Commanders, has always provided exceptional guidance, and their services will be used again this time via ocens.com satellite communication.

This C34 was virtually given to me by the former owner and friend who was very ill and who has since died. He just wanted it off his mind and not to burden his family. I literally took it over and paid the costs to store it and launch it this summer. C34's are virtually unheard of in Sweden where most people are used to Hallberg Rassy, Najad, Malo. Arcrona and Swans. Moreover, 25% VAT and shipping costs make things extra expensive. I need a new main and genoa. They are the original sails from 1998. Yikes! Cost is about $7,000 here for both sails from North Sails or a local sailmaker using Dimension-Polyant fabric. So, the market value of this boat, assuming I could find and owner, is quite low here. In the US, it would be much higher, and I would like to have it Florida where I live in the winter months. I do not think it is worth transporting by cargo vessel.

My greatest concern is not the trip or the crew or weather, etc. I am concerned about the C34 itself. Does it have the integrity of hull, rigging and strength to deal with unexpected situations? There seems to be little or no information about this topic other than what I copied in my last post. This CE rating system is promoted by Beneteau over here. What design parameters were used with the C34: Force 10, 8, 6 or something else? How can I find out? This is my question. Would Catalina offer an answer? What do you think?

Thanks for your continued support.
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Gary Brockman

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #16 on: July 20, 2020, 09:50:20 AM »

It all depends on the conditions you experience. A well made deepwater boat can have major problems and a Columbia 26 can go around the world without seeing winds over 20 kts. An Islander 36 was beefed up and went around the world a few years ago with only a few problems.

The mast and rigging on a 34 are over sized and should not be a problem, as long as they are in good condition. The hull is well built and strong enough. My question would be if the connection of hull to deck joint and the bulkheads could take the beating. The cockpit on a Mk I is very large and the drains are far to small to drain it fast enough if you take a wave. Installing larger drains through the transom would help. The extreme forces on the rudder are always a potential problem, so the rudder and the steering system should be gone over very carefully. I would want a strong under deck auto pilot with a back up. As mentioned above, plywood window covers could protect the ports. I would rather take a 34 to Hawaii than cross the Atlantic, but it can be done.
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Squall
1986 Hull #231
Tall Rig/Fin Keel - Elliptical Rudder
Marina del Rey, California

Noah

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #17 on: July 20, 2020, 10:20:15 AM »

I doubt you will get a meaningful commitment as to the structural rating/classification seaworthiness scale number, especially from Catalina Yachts—who are already on record as promoting the boat as a coastal cruiser. I agree with Gary that the boat is strongly built in most important places, but there are things to look for, inspect, upgrade.  I would install a Hydrovane or some other wind vane system that could also serve as an emergency rudder. Add some solar power, and with a large crew, on a 3 week passage, you will need more water capacity. Maybe add strong double whisker pole set-up too.
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1990 hull #1014, San Diego, CA,  Fin Keel,
Standard Rig

patrice

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2020, 05:12:28 PM »

Hi,

I know a couple who sailed their 89 Cat34 from montreal, quebec, canada all the way to the Martinique island.
They spent the first winter in the bahamas, and sailed slowly (like if you could go fast) down south after that.
And they made it back after 4 years of sailing.

But I know that it is not ocean crossing.
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_____________
Patrice
1989 MKI #970
TR, WK, M25XP
   _/)  Free Spirit
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weseitz

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #19 on: July 21, 2020, 01:26:06 AM »

Hello all:

I want to thank you for your substantive remarks. They are all very helpful. I'm still not too sure about the integrity of the boat to make the crossing, and I doubt that I will ever get a definitive answer. Your remarks are very useful. So, its something of a risk. I know there are similar and smaller boats that have made it before. I have an estimate from a transporter who has quoted $15,500 for a "mast up" transport in October from Malmo Sweden to Port Everglades. All insurance included. Sounds tempting since I have a very small investment in this boat right now. Having the boat in Florida versus Sweden would be an advantage for rebuilding it. Still not too sure. My slip neighbor here in Sweden spent 12 years circling the globe in his Najad 42. He made every repair on his own except for a new teak deck. He encourages me everyday to make the crossing. I would not call him a risk taker.
Thanks again for your advice. It is greatly appreciated.
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Noah

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #20 on: July 21, 2020, 09:20:21 AM »

To quote the late Senator Lloyd Bentsen in his famous debate against Catalina 34, “I know Najad Yachts, and you sir are no Najad...”  :abd: 8)
« Last Edit: July 21, 2020, 09:42:08 AM by Noah »
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1990 hull #1014, San Diego, CA,  Fin Keel,
Standard Rig

Ron Hill

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #21 on: July 21, 2020, 02:38:03 PM »

Bill : The C34 is built like a tank with most items oversized.  However, the structure that I would be most concerned about is the spade rudder!!

My thought
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Ron, Apache #788
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