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Author Topic: Air conditioning a C-34  (Read 5838 times)

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kntclark

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Air conditioning a C-34
« on: July 18, 2001, 03:08:58 PM »

I'm thinking about adding A/C to our 1990 C-34.  I have a couple of questions for those of you who already have it installed.
 1. How many BTUs?
 2. Where is the A/C unit located?
 3. Where did you run the ducts for the other cabins?
 4. Where did you put the through-hulls?
 
 Thanks for the help.
 
 Terry Clark
 Yet To Be #1095
 
 [This message was edited by Terry Clark on July 18, 2001 at 03:52 PM.]
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bjmansfield

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C34 air conditioning
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2001, 06:56:27 PM »

Mermaid 16500 btu reverse cycle unit installed in the forward section of the port cockpit locker.  The return air is in the head above the sink.  One duct is located in the aft cabin and one is in the main cabin above the navigation station. The raw water  intake, filter  and pump are under the aft berth.  The A/C is on a separate 30 amp circuit (with the battery charger).
 
 Am pleased with this arrangement as the space it is installed in has  very limited access for general storage anyway.  Main downside is have to leave the head door open when the A/C is on and you can hear the A/C cycle in the aft cabin but you get used to it quickly.
 
 the boat  is in S. Texas where it is very hot/humid about 8 months of the year.  for this area anyway, anything smaller than 16000 btu is  to small.
 
 Feel free to e-mail if you need  more details?
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Ron Hill

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A/C
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2001, 06:56:52 PM »

Contact Bill Beck at debacksam@erols.com or (703) 307 - 4255. He installed one in his 1991 C34.  Here's where I've seen the compressor installed in a MK I - in the V berth, in the compartment just fwd of the mast, under the Nav table, in the hanging locker by the Nav table, and after installation of a type I MSD in the port side locker where the waste tank used to be.
 
 Bill may favor his installation, but he can give you some ideas on the pros and cons of the other places. He can also answer your other questions better than most.
 
 Ron, Apache #788
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Ron, Apache #788

Jim Rose

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C34 Air Conditioning
« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2001, 07:17:33 AM »

I used the Vector series, 12,000 Btu by Marine Air Systems. The unit is located under the forward cushion of the dinette.  The return air grill is installed next to the unit under the seat.  The duct is located to the right in the forward cabin locker.  There is a Y so the main supply exits through the bulkhead in the main cabin.  The second duct exits through the shelf in the forward cabin, above the locker.  The sea water pump and strainer are located in the head under the sink.  The overboard drain is centered through the boot top stripe on the hull.  The digtal controls are located at the nav station.  I have no problem with just a single 30 Amp. circuit with the 12,000 Btu. unit.  I don't cool the aft cabin or the head.  If I open the door it would cool it.  The boat is in Gloucester, MA it might be different in Texas or Florida.
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Roc

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A/C in MKII
« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2001, 09:39:54 AM »

I have a 16,000 btu Vector Compact Marine Air unit installed under the sink in the head.  I glassed a shelf just beyond the two seacocks.  The return grill is right above the molded seat (to the right of the little door under the sink).  There is a vent leading to the bulkhead in the aft cabin.  The main vent goes behind the molded panel (runs right above the toilet tissue holder)to the locker next to the nav table.  It exits on top of the locker.  The v-berth vent also goes behind the molded panel, but runs under the toilet tissue holder, straight through behind the nav table to the locker in the v-berth on the port side.  It sits right under the shelves(don't even know it's there unless you bend down to look) and supplys the v-berth just above the cushion.  The intake water is fed with the original head intake seacock (I plumbed the head intake hose to the sink drain and flush with fresh water).  The strainer is accessed through the little door under the sink.  The circulating pump is mounted right under the small access cover on the port side under the aft cabin cushions. Except for the small area lost in the upper section of the locker next to the nav table, no other space is lost.  I plan on putting louver inserts on the bottom half of the head and aft cabin doors for circulation. The original 30 amp service is sufficient.
 
 Roc-
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Roc - "Sea Life" 2000 MKII #1477.  Rock Hall, MD

dpenz

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Air conditioning a C-34
« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2001, 10:45:40 AM »

I also have a reverse cycle Mermaid 16,500 Btuh unit.  I wouldn't go any smaller in a warm climate.  Insulated sun-blocking panels to cover the overhead hatches and portlights exposed to direct sun will help to reduce heat load.
 
 My unit is mounted under the V-berth, with supply ducts extending through the V-berth hanging locker and from there discharging into the V-berth, the main cabin wall and under the dinette table.  Water pump is in the bilge, in the compartment just aft of the mast, outlet is a new thru-hull above the water line adjacent to the unit, and the intake uses the macerator outlet thru-hull.  We use holding tank only, so that thru-hull was available.  With 30A service, we can't heat water and run the air conditioning at the same time, but the A/C is compatible with all other loads.
 
 We have only used the aft cabin for storage, so there is no cooling there or in the head.  In summer we generally sleep in the main cabin, with the door to the V-berth closed, to block most of the A/C noise.  That's my main complaint, the whining noise travels throughout the boat.  This summer I may attempt to install rubber isolators and perhaps some internally insulated duct.
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bjmansfield

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C34 A/C installation
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2001, 01:01:19 PM »

David brought up some good points.  The previous owner who installed the A/C wanted to be able to run the hot water heater and A/C at the same time thus the separate ciruit. Otherwise there is no need for one.
 
 Unless you go for a single compressor with 2 air handlers (probably the ideal), where you install seems to depend on where you sleep (V or aft).  If you sleep in the aft cabin in hot weather country, you absolutely have to have a duct back there.  We use the aft cabin and have found the large duct over the nav. station gets enough air into the v-berth for comfortable sleeping.
 Per Roc's suggestion, we have a grill vent in the aft berth door to help circulation.  Intend to install one in the head door but havent yet.
 
 Also, the condensate drain is T'd into the head sink drain/thru hull.
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Ken Juul

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RE: A/C
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2001, 03:28:31 PM »

In hot climates, I think a minimum of 16000 BTU's is required to keep the boat cool.  I have an unusual set up.  12000 BTU unit under the forward dinette settee with ducts for the main cabin/galley.  A second 6000 BTU unit was added under the V berth with ducts for the V berth area.  I think this was added as an after thought.  The previous owner had 3 small children that shared the V berth in a bunk bed arrangement.  Water intake is through a thru hull in the forward hanging locker, seperate exhaust thru hulls above the water line.  The Main unit is wired through the A/C CB/Switch on the panel, the second unit is wired into the Outlets CB/Switch.  I have to be careful with the electrical load or the main CB blows.  A seperate circuit would be recommended way to go and a future project.  We added a 12v "clip on" fan with a long lead to help cooling.  Clip it to the aft cabin door to help cool the aft bunk, clip it on the galley side storage door track to cool the chef or point it forward to the dinnette.  All my duct work is on the stbd side, still trying to figure out a way to get a duct into the aft cabin.  Although with the bimini/dodger up, the aft cabin doesn't get as hot as I had imagined it would.  I like the 2 unit set up.  I think one up forward and one in the suggested location in the port locker/head makes best sense for cooling/routing of ducts, but the added weight will add to the port list.
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Ken & Vicki Juul
Luna Loca #1090
Chesapeake Bay
Past Commodore C34IA

Sails Call

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air conditioning
« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2001, 08:22:58 PM »

The port hanging locker just aft of the nav station seemed the perfect spot for us.  We installed a 1600 BTU unit that we carfully measured before proceeding.  Space was tight, but it was a perfect fit.  The louvered door was outfitted with an aluminum frame into which slides an air filter.  4" duct was run through the head behind the sliding panels and back into the aft cabin.  A two-inch duct feeds the head and another 4: duct runs behind the port side berth, through the bulkhead, and into the V-berth.  We used the head intake instead of punching another through hull.  That is our only regret.  We have to leave the head on wet-bowl  or the water doesn't flow correctly and the unit shuts down.  Next spring, we will install the through-hull that came with the unit.  
 TOM BOWEN
 SAILS CALL
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Roc

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Message to Sails Call
« Reply #9 on: August 23, 2001, 05:25:41 AM »

Why not Tee the head intake hose into the sink drain hose.  To flush with sea water, just open the seacock and put the strainer/plug into the sink drain opening.  This will cause the toiliet to draw water from the seacock.  If you want to flush with fresh water, close the seacock and fill the sink with water.  The toilet now draws water from the sink.  Now you'll have a seacock dedicated to your A/C and you have flexibility with flushing your toilet with fresh or sea water.  Also makes winterizing the toilet easy, just fill the sink with pink stuff and pump it through.
 
 Roc-
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Roc - "Sea Life" 2000 MKII #1477.  Rock Hall, MD

charles

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Air Conditioning "Roc -- Sea Life"
« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2001, 11:39:03 AM »

Roc,
 read your reply -- I would like more details on your A/C installation into your MK II.
 Like -- did you cut a door from the aft cabin into the area under the sink to get the unit in?
 And many more questions I'm sure.
 
 How can i contact you?
 
 Charlie Hull # 1498
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c34member

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A/C
« Reply #11 on: August 30, 2001, 10:08:41 AM »

We have a 16,5000 Btu (18,000 Btu R-C heat) Mermaid under the v-berth.  V-berth vent is a 45 degree angle 4" x 6" teak grille w/4" duct on the top of the stbd hanging locker.  Main salon is a 6" x 8" teak grille just over the settee cushions in the corner with the 6" duct placed inside the same hanging locker.  I moved the clothes hanger rod out 2" and still can hang clothes, but it's tight (I insulated the duct with a water-heater jacket cut to size.  I used the macerator discharge through-hull (we don't dump, we pump) for the intake and ran the discharge back to the transom so the water noise wouldn't bother us or our neighbors.  I had to put camper tape all around the v-berth bin lid to keep it from vibrating like a speaker.  Much quieter now.
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captran

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air
« Reply #12 on: September 13, 2001, 03:06:28 PM »

We just got back from 2 months aboard in the Bahamas.  The 1997  we bought had an air conditioner.  we had to have it serviced. 2 day turn around. Mermaid air, 1600btu. They are in Ft Meyers. Thru hull forward under v berth, close to center line. output above water line on starboard side.  unit is a one piece.  mounts under seat  along bulkhead by dinette.  air intake under table.  Only 2 vents.  one v berth, other in main cabin.  I may add an aft cabin smaller hose, which I saw on other boats.  wiring, which I had to remove to send the unit in for service, was very straightforward.  stayed at marinas about 10 times in 2 months and it was heaven! My unit has a de humidifier, programmable setting.  very nice.
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