Join the C34 Association Today!
[C34 Home] [C34Tech Notes] [C34 Tech Wiki] [Join!]
Please login or register.
Advanced search  

News:

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Real Newbie Question - Schaefer 2100 roller reefing  (Read 254 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

KeelsonGraham

  • Forum - Seaman
  • **
  • Karma: 0
  • Posts: 44
    • View Profile
Real Newbie Question - Schaefer 2100 roller reefing
« on: December 16, 2021, 08:45:44 AM »

OK, so now Iím going to have to reveal what a total greenhorn I am when it comes to boat ownership!

I have to take the genoa off before the boat is lifted next month. I have no idea how to do this!

I have Schaefer 2100 roller reefing system. After unfurling the genoa do I simply disconnect the foot, release the halyard and pull the sail down and out of the slot?? Or is there more to it than that?

Also, how do I do this in anything other than a flat calm (unlikely in the UK within the time available).
« Last Edit: December 16, 2021, 10:17:06 AM by Stu Jackson »
Logged
2006 Catalina 34 Mk II. Hull No:1752

KWKloeber

  • Forum - Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy
  • ********
  • Karma: 35
  • Posts: 4253
  • "Positive Impact" 1984 C-30 mk-I #3573 trbsfk M-25
    • View Profile
Re: Real Newbie Question
« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2021, 09:05:20 AM »

,

release the halyard and pull the sail down and out of the slot??

Also, how do I do this in anything other than a flat calm (unlikely in the UK within the time available).


Greenhorn,

We ALL been there at some point. <no shock>

Yes, basically. Dropping the halyard will drop the swivel.  Just un shackle the headsail and flake/fold er up.

A calm day trying to drop er?  Welcome to boating.

If you canít get one, then she needs to be oriented head to wind (or ever so slightly off) ó  bring the sail down onto the side deck without blowing off uncontrollably.  Running the lee sheet aft along where you want the sail to lay and tensioning the clew it will keep the foot where you want it (keep the tack shackled to the drum (or tied off to a bow rail) then remove it after itís under control.)
Logged
Twenty years from now you'll be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did.
So throw off the bowlines.  Sail away from the safe harbor.  Catch the tradewinds in your sails.
Explore.  Dream.  Discover.   -Mark Twain

glennd3

  • Forum - Petty Officer 1st Class
  • *****
  • Karma: 6
  • Posts: 408
    • View Profile
Re: Real Newbie Question
« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2021, 10:07:20 AM »

The head sail is easy, I find the main sail to be more of a pain. Welcome to the club.
Logged
Glenn Davis
Knot Yet
1990 Catalina 34 Mk 1.5
Hull 1053
TR/WK
M25XP
Patapsco River
Chesapeake Bay Maryland

Stu Jackson

  • C34IA - Secretary
  • Forum - Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy
  • ********
  • Karma: 73
  • Posts: 8121
    • View Profile
Re: Real Newbie Question
« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2021, 10:14:38 AM »

KG, you should also examine how you will eventually re-raise the headsail.  On my ProFurl LCI32, there is a special fitting that slips and locks into the slot in the furling extrusion where the sail slides into the slot.  It is called a feeder.  Once the sail is back up, the feeder is detached and stored.  You don't need the feeder to drop the sail. 

You should have one similar for your Shaeffer system I would presume.  Lots of C34s came with those furlers, so some skippers with them should be able to advise on the details of that feeder for your specific furler.

I would also venture to guess that the furler manual has instructions and that they can be found online.

PS - I edited your OP title.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2021, 10:17:38 AM by Stu Jackson »
Logged
Stu Jackson, C34 IA Secretary, #224 1986, "Aquavite"  Cowichan Bay, BC  Maple Bay Marina  SR/FK, M25, Rocna 10 (22#) (NZ model)

"There is no problem so great that it can't be solved."

KWKloeber

  • Forum - Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy
  • ********
  • Karma: 35
  • Posts: 4253
  • "Positive Impact" 1984 C-30 mk-I #3573 trbsfk M-25
    • View Profile
Re: Real Newbie Question - Schaefer 2100 roller reefing
« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2021, 10:28:50 AM »

Great point

- the feeder (minimally useful) is permanently attached to my extrusion, but some have additionally used another "prefeeder" (temporary, typically shackled to the drum via a 1/8" wire rope.)

West and others sell those aftermarket prefeeders
Logged
Twenty years from now you'll be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did.
So throw off the bowlines.  Sail away from the safe harbor.  Catch the tradewinds in your sails.
Explore.  Dream.  Discover.   -Mark Twain

PaulJacobs

  • Forum - Petty Officer 3rd Class
  • ***
  • Karma: 2
  • Posts: 61
    • View Profile
Re: Real Newbie Question
« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2021, 10:59:22 AM »

Is your boat on a mooring or in a slip?  It does make a difference.  First, unfurl the headsail.  If you are on a mooring the boat will tend to orient itself bow-into-the-wind. Notice the word "tend".  Since the wind direction varies from moment to moment, it is NOT at all unusual, even on a mooring, to find the sails filling.  I agree with Ken; snug at least one of the headsail sheets as this will keep the foot secure.  If possible, find a friend to help.  They can gradually lower the halyard while you ensure that the sail does not go into the water.  Second have a short piece of line (4 - 5 ft long) handy.  Third, take the jib halyard off the headsail and attach it to the upper portion of the headsail furler "upper swivel".  Fourth, tie the lower part of the swivel to the tack fitting adjacent to the bow roller.  Fifth tension the jib halyard to keep the halyard away from the mast all winter.  Sixth, do your best to flake, fold and bag the headsail.  It is difficult on the relatively narrow C-34 side deck, so you may want to do a nicer job later when on land.  If you are in a slip the same steps apply, but you may have to deal with a non-favorable wind direction, in which case a second person is critical, and even a third helper may prove very handy to keep the sail out of the water.

Removing the mainsail is similar but even a bit more difficult.  First, raise the mainsail - this is necessary to remove the mast slugs and battens.  Second, unscrew the "stopper bolt" on the aft side of the mast just above the boom.  This will allow you to remove the slugs and battens.  Third, slowly lower the main halyard, removing slugs and battens as you go.  If the wind is blowing this is easier said than done.  Have a friend keep some tension on the mainsail luff so it does not flog as you attempt to remove slugs and battens.  Keep all of the sail on whatever side is to leeward and be sure it does not go into the water.  Fourth, replace the "stopper bolt" before you drive home with it in your pocket. Fifth, disconnect the outhaul and remove the foot of the sail from the boom track, or, if you have a loose-footed mainsail, slide the aft slug forward and off the boom. Sixth, disconnect the halyard from the head of the mainsail, and connect it somewhere away from the mast, and then tension it for the winter.  Seventh, again with help, flake, fold and bag the mainsail.  Once again, if the result is "lumpy", repeat the last step on shore.

Finally, and this is important, take the sails to your favorite local sailmaker, have them check the sails to repair any broken threads, rips, etc., and then have them cleaned/washed.  Yes, this is not free, but from my experience it is well worth doing.  Sails are subject to wind, salt, UV, flogging, and myriad stresses.  Salt crystals can act like microscopic sources of abrasion.  New sails are expensive and professionally washing & cleaning sails will not only extend their lives by a number of years but keep them looking better as well.

Remember, all of us had to learn these things by doing them a first time.  I made the mistake - my first time - of thinking "how difficult could this be?" so I tried to do it myself on a windy day.  The headsail blew over the lifelines and went into the bay!  Now, not only did I have to deal with a flogging sail, but one that was soaking wet.  In my case I learned the hard way to ask a few friends ... hopefully the ones you took sailing during the summer ... for help.

Dr. Paul Jacobs
Pleiades
1990 TR/FK No. 1068
Wickford, RI
Logged

Jim Hardesty

  • Forum - Master Chief Petty Officer
  • *******
  • Karma: 11
  • Posts: 1411
    • View Profile
Re: Real Newbie Question - Schaefer 2100 roller reefing
« Reply #6 on: December 16, 2021, 11:41:09 AM »

Quote
I have Schaefer 2100 roller reefing system. After unfurling the genoa do I simply disconnect the foot, release the halyard and pull the sail down and out of the slot?? Or is there more to it than that?
Also, how do I do this in anything other than a flat calm (unlikely in the UK within the time available).

That's the basic process.  Just a few thoughts.  I leave the tack on till the sail is down.  If the wind is forward, that's much better.  I often leave the slip and anchor in a protected nearby bay to bend on and off sails.  Still some wind but always on the bow.  I have, reasonably well, flaked and folded sails on the boat but it's not easy.  I have a very large bag, twice the size of the sail bag, I use to stuff the sail into when not able to flake and fold.  Not necessary but very helpful is another person.  As the sail comes down one at the forestay one on the halyard, after it's down to be flaked and folded, one at the luft, one on the leach.  Saves a lot of back and forth.
Hope that helps and wasn't too long winded.
Jim
Logged
Jim Hardesty
2001 MKII hull #1570 M35BC  "Shamrock"
sailing Lake Erie
from Commodore Perry Yacht Club
Erie, PA

KeelsonGraham

  • Forum - Seaman
  • **
  • Karma: 0
  • Posts: 44
    • View Profile
Re: Real Newbie Question - Schaefer 2100 roller reefing
« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2021, 12:02:30 PM »

Thanks guys for such excellent and helpful advice. Iím in a marina, so the plan is to wait for a day when the wind is on the nose.

I did read my Shaeffer manual - but couldnít make head nor tail of it.

The Leisurefurl in-boom system means I donít have to worry so much bout that
« Last Edit: December 16, 2021, 12:09:23 PM by KeelsonGraham »
Logged
2006 Catalina 34 Mk II. Hull No:1752

Ron Hill

  • Forum - Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy
  • ********
  • Karma: 61
  • Posts: 7785
    • View Profile
Re: Real Newbie Question - Schaefer 2100 roller reefing
« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2021, 02:12:40 PM »

KG : I agree with Jim, leave the tack connected until the head of the genoa is all the way down.  Then I flake my 150 after releasing the tack & head  rolling the sail up (tight enough) to get it into a sail bag!!

A thought
« Last Edit: December 17, 2021, 02:01:15 PM by Ron Hill »
Logged
Ron, Apache #788
Pages: [1]   Go Up