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Author Topic: Long Passage Capacity Limits  (Read 270 times)

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KeelsonGraham

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Long Passage Capacity Limits
« on: September 13, 2021, 08:24:58 AM »

Hi all,

Iím trying to asses how viable it would be to do the ARC Atlantic in my C34 Mk II. Iíve made my peace with all the issues discussed around ocean sailing on this forum. This is a low latitude trade wind route so I think the risk factor is reasonably low.

However, what Iím REALLY struggling with is the European CE rating plate on the boat. This sets the maximum payload at 850 kg. I canít for the life of me see how I can plan for 25 days at sea with a weight limit of only 850 kg. Diesel, water, food and 3 crew alone brings this up to 900 kg.

None of the big passage making threads on this forum seem to mention weight limits and whether itís safe to exceed them.

Anyone got any thoughts on this?

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2006 Catalina 34 Mk II. Hull No:1752

KeelsonGraham

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Re: Long Passage Capacity Limits
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2021, 02:08:56 AM »

Interestingly, I canít find any mention of maximum payload on US sites, or in any of the original Catalina documentation. So, maybe this 850 kg thing is a bit of extra European bureaucracy.
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Stu Jackson

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Re: Long Passage Capacity Limits
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2021, 10:56:01 AM »

Interestingly, I canít find any mention of maximum payload on US sites, or in any of the original Catalina documentation. So, maybe this 850 kg thing is a bit of extra European bureaucracy.

KG, that was my thought and I was going to ask if you could post the text to it.

Many of our skippers back in SF would race with at least six people on their boats, although I'd guess they didn't have much else on their boats.  One successful skipper told me that he emptied his water tanks and only had 1/4 tank of fuel when he raced!

You might also check out Steve Dolling's excellent reports on his trip from Vancouver to Mexico.  You can find them here:

https://c34.org/bbs/index.php/topic,5270.0.html
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Stu Jackson, C34 IA Secretary, #224 1986, "Aquavite"  Cowichan Bay, BC  Maple Bay Marina  SR/FK, M25, Rocna 10 (22#) (NZ model)

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Holger Dieske

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Re: Long Passage Capacity Limits
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2021, 03:52:52 AM »

I am in Europe and my ship is it too (since 28years). Bit I cant find everyone abaut tje CE Norm and the Maximum whigt. The CE is just burocratie ;)
What class of CE (A,B...) ist in your documentes?

I am sure, the C34 ist okay for Atlantik crossing, a Lot of Europeans do this White more Bad boats.

Holger
« Last Edit: September 15, 2021, 03:53:52 AM by Holger Dieske »
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I am from Germany and I use Google-Translator! (and a little bit my brian ;) )

C34 "RUNAWAY" Mark 1.5 - 1992 WK - Hull Nr. 1219 - Yanmar3GM30F - Flag: German - Boat stay in Mediterranean Sea.

KeelsonGraham

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Re: Long Passage Capacity Limits
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2021, 08:47:46 AM »

Hi Stu, yes, I read Steveís reports on his trip. In fact Iíve read just about everything I can find on ocean passages in the Cat.

My biggest concern is the strength of the fore hatch. Iíll probably make a fibreglass cover for it. But, TBH, once Iíve got down as far as the Canaries, the biggest wind-related risks are probably over. Years ago my parents crossed in their (ocean-going) Vancouver 32. The crossing itself was quiet but they suffered a Force 11 on the way to Las Palmas. Planning to fit a Jordan series drogue just in case.

Hi Holger. My CE rating is A but I attach no credibility to that. The Catalina is clearly a coastal boat designed for coastal cruising, so taking it offshore is a calculated risk.

I think that 850 kg thing is a bit of a red herring. It simply doesnít feature in US documents.

What probably matters a lot more is balancing the mass across the boat. Maybe biased towards the stern given that the crossing is all downwind.
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Stu Jackson

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Re: Long Passage Capacity Limits
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2021, 10:05:23 AM »

Hi Stu, yes, I read Steveís reports on his trip. In fact Iíve read just about everything I can find on ocean passages in the Cat.

My biggest concern is the strength of the fore hatch. Iíll probably make a fibreglass cover for it. But, TBH, once Iíve got down as far as the Canaries, the biggest wind-related risks are probably over. Years ago my parents crossed in their (ocean-going) Vancouver 32. The crossing itself was quiet but they suffered a Force 11 on the way to Las Palmas. Planning to fit a Jordan series drogue just in case

..................................................

In addition to the forward hatch, I suggest you consider the fixed portlights, too.

IIRC, one of Steve's "best" was his watermaker.  I'm sure you've considered this.

I also recall some Catalina 36s doing crossings, so looking into the experiences of our sister boats should help, too.
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Stu Jackson, C34 IA Secretary, #224 1986, "Aquavite"  Cowichan Bay, BC  Maple Bay Marina  SR/FK, M25, Rocna 10 (22#) (NZ model)

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KeelsonGraham

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Re: Long Passage Capacity Limits
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2021, 11:57:24 AM »

Hi Stu,

Yes, Iím thinking of marine ply for the biggest ones. But Iím damned if I can think of a way of securing them without drilling a ton of holes in the superstructure. Highly undesirable. In any case these are weapons of last resort. The key thing, in my view, will be to get onto the series drogue early. This will substantially reduce the risk of a knock down.

Weíre going with the Rainman portable watermaker powered by a Honda 2000. The Rainmanís output is incredible, which will make for a much pleasanter crossing. Plus we should be able to sell it on at the end of the trip
« Last Edit: September 15, 2021, 11:59:40 AM by KeelsonGraham »
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2006 Catalina 34 Mk II. Hull No:1752
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