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Author Topic: Propane question  (Read 2693 times)

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Stucker

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Propane question
« on: September 26, 2016, 05:00:01 PM »

Apologies if this has been covered before. Just bought a 03 Cat 34 and it's my first time with a boat that has a propane cooktop and stove.  Can someone explain to me how one can use a propane stove in a small space without gassing themselves?  I recall many people dying after the ice storm of 98 in Quebec when they lost power and used propane BBQ's in their house for warmth. 
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Scott Tucker
2003 C34 MK II
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Jim Hardesty

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Re: Propane question
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2016, 05:30:31 PM »

I'm no expert on the subject.  Here is my take.  I think that you cook for a shorter time than you would run a heater.  Shorter time less co and co2 build up.
Jim
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Jim Hardesty
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Fred Koehlmann

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Re: Propane question
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2016, 05:41:50 PM »

I think Jim has the right idea. Also when you are cooking it is during the day time and you are probably in an out, and vents/hatches are open, but basically there is some sort of air circulation. At night time (I assume that is when most people die CO2 build up) we usually close the space up (and also to keep the heat in), thus you are also not ventilating the space.

That said if you run the oven too long, you could have a similar problem and i do remember reading NOT to use the oven as a heater. Any form of combustion is dangerous to oxygen breathers in a confined unventilated space. Better to get warm covers and get close.  :wink:
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Frederick Koehlmann: Dolphina - C425 #3, Midland, ON
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KWKloeber

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Re: Propane question
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2016, 06:41:05 PM »

Apologies if this has been covered before. Just bought a 03 Cat 34 and it's my first time with a boat that has a propane cooktop and stove.  Can someone explain to me how one can use a propane stove in a small space without gassing themselves?  I recall many people dying after the ice storm of 98 in Quebec when they lost power and used propane BBQ's in their house for warmth.

Houses are incredibly tight, especially in the winter (i.e., <<after the ice storm of 98 in Quebec when they lost power and used propane BBQ's in their house for warmth>>) when you DON'T want and go to lengths to prevent outside air infiltrating.  Not so on the boat.

-kk


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Stu Jackson

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Re: Propane question
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2016, 10:31:40 PM »

People cook in their houses with propane all over.  What's the issue?  How can one compare cooking with un-intelligent use of propane heaters?  It's like folks who die from running charcoal BBQs for heat.  I'm sorry for their tragedies, but it's plain stupid.
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Stu Jackson, C34 IA Secretary, #224 1986, "Aquavite"  Cowichan Bay, BC  Maple Bay Marina  SR/FK, M25, Rocna 10 (22#) (NZ model)

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patrice

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Re: Propane question
« Reply #5 on: September 27, 2016, 05:16:48 AM »

Hi,

As mentioned by others, your boat is not air tight like our houses.
SO there is always air circulating.
And in our case, the companionway door is always open when we are on the boat.
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Jack Hutteball

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Re: Propane question
« Reply #6 on: September 27, 2016, 04:56:07 PM »

On another note, I worry more about propane settling in the bilge as it is heavier than air.  There have been cases where boat explosions have occurred when owners have left a unlit burner open and gas escapes to the bilge.  As a safety precaution I keep the valve closed at the tank and the solenoid to the stove closes at all times when not using the stove.  I immediately close both solenoid and valve when we are thru cooking.  Gives me piece of mind.

Jack
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Jon W

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Re: Propane question
« Reply #7 on: September 27, 2016, 05:20:27 PM »

Curious if anyone has put an opening port in the fixed portlight above the stove? Similar idea to the opening Beckson port in the head.
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Jon W.
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chuck53

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Re: Propane question
« Reply #8 on: September 27, 2016, 06:32:44 PM »

On another note, I worry more about propane settling in the bilge as it is heavier than air.  There have been cases where boat explosions have occurred when owners have left a unlit burner open and gas escapes to the bilge.  As a safety precaution I keep the valve closed at the tank and the solenoid to the stove closes at all times when not using the stove.  I immediately close both solenoid and valve when we are thru cooking.  Gives me piece of mind.

Jack

Having CNG gives me peace of mind...don't have to worry about leaking gas at all.
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Ron Hill

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Re: Propane question
« Reply #9 on: September 27, 2016, 06:51:06 PM »

Stucker : When people are trying to heat the inside of a house with propane, charcoal, kerosene heaters etc. - the home/house is closed up.
 I doubt that you'd close the dorade vents and seal the boat up when you're using your propane stove.

There is always some fresh air circulating inside a C34!!

A thought
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Noah

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Re: Propane question
« Reply #10 on: September 27, 2016, 06:58:31 PM »

Meanwhile, all of the "what ifs" aside...I highly recommend you install a carbon monoxide alarm on your boat.
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Steve_in_lex

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Re: Propane question
« Reply #11 on: September 29, 2016, 06:57:43 AM »

Speaking of detectors, it's easy to find CO detectors that are stand-alone battery powered, but have had a hard time finding a propane detector that doesn't need to be plugged in to a source of power.  Any suggestions on sources or manufacturers?  Thanks.
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Steve Saudek
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KWKloeber

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Re: Propane question
« Reply #12 on: September 29, 2016, 07:08:53 AM »

Speaking of detectors, it's easy to find CO detectors that are stand-alone battery powered, but have had a hard time finding a propane detector that doesn't need to be plugged in to a source of power.  Any suggestions on sources or manufacturers?  Thanks.

Why not use a 12 volt detector?  Camping World will have one or do a google for 'em.

-kk
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Twenty years from now you'll be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did.
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Explore.  Dream.  Discover.   -Mark Twain

Noah

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Re: Propane question
« Reply #13 on: September 29, 2016, 07:12:50 AM »

Two different subjects here:
1. Carbon monoxide detector
2. Propane detector

For carbon monoxide detector/alarm, I use regular 9v battery powered home unit
For LP (propane) leak detector I use hardwired gas/fume detection system From Fireboy-Xintex with built-in solenoid LP off/on switch and sniffer module in bilge. There are a couple of other leak detectors out there but all require 12v hardwire i believe.
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Steve_in_lex

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Re: Propane question
« Reply #14 on: September 29, 2016, 02:35:21 PM »

Okay, thanks.  I was hoping for a AA battery-driven propane detector.  Looks like a wired connection is in order.
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Steve Saudek
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