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Author Topic: Pedestal guard sealant  (Read 2753 times)

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John Langford

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Pedestal guard sealant
« on: December 16, 2014, 04:54:47 PM »

On earlier versions of the Mark II (mine is a 1999) the 1" tubes of the stainless steel pedestal guard terminate on the cockpit sole in black composite (plastic?) fittings which are screwed into the sole. The pedestal guard tubes are subject to a fair amount of stress as the top of the guard is a favourite hand hold in heavy weather. Because the sealant is applied between the bottom of these two fittings and the non-skid pattern on the sole I have had trouble keeping them watertight with the result that in heavy rain I can get leaks down into the pedestal base cover in the aft cabin and eventually down into the bilge. The later MK IIs overcame this obvious design flaw by elevating the termination point of the tubes above the cockpit sole and getting rid of the non-skid pattern at this point.

Has anyone with an earlier MK II model had the same problem and come up with an effective solution for sealing the connection between the pedestal tubes and the cockpit sole? In my case, the job is complicated by the fact that both tubes are filled with instrument wiring, making it difficult to lift the SS tubes and their plastic "feet" to clean under them and the cockpit sole non-skid before reapplying sealant. I think the last time around I used Sudbury Rule Elastomeric which has served me well in other circumstances in which fittings might move in use.
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John
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Ranger Tug, 29S

Roc

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Re: Pedestal guard sealant
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2014, 04:00:07 AM »

Hi John,
I have a 2000 model and I believe my fittings are SS and not plastic.  Interesting..  Anyway, maybe Butyl Rubber tape would be a good sealant?
« Last Edit: December 17, 2014, 04:00:24 AM by Roc »
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Roc - "Sea Life" 2000 MKII #1477.  Rock Hall, MD

mregan

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Re: Pedestal guard sealant
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2014, 10:34:20 AM »

You should countersink the screw holes then use butyl.  What I like to do is roll a bit up into a thin strip and stick it in the screw hole.  Then roll a ball of butyl and stick it on the countersunk part.  Lay the plastic fittings down then insert the screws.  The countersunk portion will fill with butyl and won't get squished out when you tighten the screws down.  I always figured the thin part of the butyl in the hole would wrap around the screw and help seal the hole.
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Roc

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Re: Pedestal guard sealant
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2014, 10:41:22 AM »

Mainesail has great how-to's for butyl tape.  I would suggest "potting" the holes if any wood is between the fiberglass....

http://www.pbase.com/mainecruising/rebedding_hardware

http://www.pbase.com/mainecruising/sealing_the_deck

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Roc - "Sea Life" 2000 MKII #1477.  Rock Hall, MD

John Langford

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Re: Pedestal guard sealant
« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2014, 02:19:28 PM »

Thanks for the suggestions. Countersinking the two screw holes is a good idea but may not be possible because I can neither get the black plastic feet off or even raise them very much off the sole because of all the tight wiring in the pedestal tubes. Also, the screws penetrate into the plywood part of the sandwich but do not go through the whole sole. So the rainwater is running along the cockpit sole and getting under the plastic feet and coming down the central hole which is where the wiring runs. And it's not coming from higher up the tubes or down from the instrument pods at the top of the pedestal guard as they are all covered by a sunbrella wheel cover.

I will ponder it further and let you know if I come up with anything innovative.
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John
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DaveM

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Re: Pedestal guard sealant
« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2014, 03:54:10 PM »

John

On my ODay 35 I installed metal feet with counter sunk screw holes and butyl tape (Mainesail). I through bolted the holes with lined with thickened epoxy after reaming out some of the plywood.  That way I will know if the screws start leaking.  Lot of stress on these screws.   On the wiring holes made a counter bore from below so the pipe was supported on the lip above.  Before inserting pipe drilled a side hole in foot half way up for drainage.  Put thick layer of butyl tape around wire hole including the lip on the deck and inside foot socket for the pipe.  Then inserted the pipe, set the set screw. I then pushed the butyl all around hole and the bottom edge of the pipe.  Hope this is clear.  Send me a PM if need more.

Goodwinds
DaveM
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Dave Mauney, O'Day 35, 1989, "DAMWEGAS" , Oriental, NC , M25XP

John Langford

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Re: Pedestal guard sealant
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2015, 03:19:07 PM »

It is with the standard quotient of humility that I retire my question by confessing that the water appears to be coming in not through the base of the pedestal guard tubes but via the cover for the emergency tiller which I had failed to tighten down properly during a recent inspection. I tightened it down and the bilge remained bone dry during the recent Pacific Northwest deluge.
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John
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