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Author Topic: Anchoring in a storm  (Read 1523 times)

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Ken Juul

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Anchoring in a storm
« on: August 30, 2011, 05:48:42 AM »

Many of you have probably seen the tv or facebook footage of the sailboat that was washed ashore in Norfolk during Irene.  Dumb move, glad they are safe, wish they hadn't put the emergency folks in danger.  Don't want to start that debate/rant.

Posting to show the wrong way to anchor with all chain rode, especially in a storm.  Notice how the chain has sawn through the bow of the boat!  If you are using all chain, you should be using a bridal to transfer the load on the chain to the bow cleats, the chain between the bridle and the bow should be slack.  I'll give them the benefit of doubt, perhaps they thought it was too rough to attempt attach the bridle.

Picture from CBS News.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2011, 05:49:41 AM by Ken Juul »
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Ken & Vicki Juul
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wind dancer

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Re: Anchoring in a storm
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2011, 10:05:38 AM »

I'm not sure this guy was anywhere near his boat -- if so, he should have removed his canvas and sails.  I agree about the bridle and add that he should've had a second anchor out too.
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Jay Guard, 1996 Catalina 380, #3, "Aquila", Seattle

Stu Jackson

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Re: Anchoring in a storm
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2011, 10:43:16 AM »

As I understand the story from other websites, they left Norfolk heading for Annapolis during the storm and anchored out in a "bad" place under "duress."  In retrospect, they shoulda stayed put or found a much closer marina, which they could well have done.

http://www.wvec.com/video?id=128654758&sec=554037

Waterdog's experience with his 100 feet of chain plus a bit of rode makes an awful lot of sense for a good rig.  As I recall, Steve had a severe weather condition at anchor in Mexico and held just fine, 'cuz the rode he left out after his chain was all deployed acted as the snubber.  He's described his rig very well in his anchoring and "1500 Mile Update" posts.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2011, 11:09:00 AM by Stu Jackson »
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Stu Jackson, C34 IA Secretary, #224 1986, "Aquavite"  Cowichan Bay, BC  Maple Bay Marina  SR/FK, M25, Rocna 10 (22#) (NZ model)

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Ron Hill

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Re: Anchoring in a storm
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2011, 05:56:49 PM »

Stu's account confirms that - those people were trying to outrun a hurricane in a sail boat!?! 

Not smart, as I've only heard it being done successfully by a cigarette boat (with extra fuel). 
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Ron, Apache #788

waterdog

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Re: Anchoring in a storm
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2011, 10:35:51 PM »

Waterdog's experience with his 100 feet of chain plus a bit of rode makes an awful lot of sense for a good rig.  As I recall, Steve had a severe weather condition at anchor in Mexico and held just fine, 'cuz the rode he left out after his chain was all deployed acted as the snubber.  He's described his rig very well in his anchoring and "1500 Mile Update" posts.

Yes, but...   That is just my regular anchoring rig.   It held fine in 50 knots.   That's gusts to 50 knots all over in 20 minutes.   No sustained winds at 60+.   No storm surge.  No seas.   I would argue that the anchor rig is much more stressed for a couple of hours in a two foot chop.   Severe storm conditions are something entirely different.   Nylon rode needs chafe gear, frequent adjustment.  Often it fails from internal heat build up.  Chain on a bridle isn't such a bad idea...  But I don't really have any experience in real storm conditions.   
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Steve Dolling
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