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Author Topic: in-mast furling and boom adjustment  (Read 2492 times)

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alevine

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in-mast furling and boom adjustment
« on: November 11, 2009, 09:50:42 AM »

I purchased a Catalina 34 2004 this Fall.  Recently I noted that the car on the top of the boom does not move freely and the outhaul is difficult to operate.   On closer inspection, many of the bearing on the inside rails of the car were chippd or cracked.  I hae Garhauer sending me a replacement and packed bearings on a piece of track.  With care, the transfer should go alright.   It has been suggested that the angleof the boom is very critical here and the loading and movement of the car requires a boom at an angle of about 87 degrees relative to the mast. 
I do not want to repeat the damages .. Can any of my fellow in-mast sailors advise me on these matters.  Thanks in advance for the informed opinions. 

Aaron 
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tonywright

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Re: in-mast furling and boom adjustment
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2009, 11:43:22 AM »

Hi Aaron

Thank you for posting a description of your problem. I have not noticed this problem myself. I saw a similar type of problem on a traveller on my last boat after taking the stress of a couple of uncontrolled gybes. I wonder if the car on your boom had suffered some unusual stresses in some way?  

We have loaded a manual for the in-mast furling in the "manuals" section of the site. Take a look at the last couple of pages which describe how best to orient the boom when furling etc. It says "slightly raised" is best.

If you ever need to have the mast unstepped, note the requirement to use a wooden wedge to prevent damage to the slot. I made up a wedge with eyebolts either end, and raise it using the halyard while keeping tension on with a downhaul line. This keeps the wedge in the slot nicely.

Cheers

Tony
« Last Edit: November 11, 2009, 01:30:06 PM by tonywright »
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Tony Wright
#1657 2003 34 MKII  "Vagabond"
Nepean Sailing Club, Ottawa, Canada

Stu Jackson

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Re: in-mast furling and boom adjustment
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2009, 11:50:44 AM »

Here's the link to the manuals page:  http://www.c34.org/wiki/index.php?title=Manuals

How to get there?  Either click on "C34 Tech wiki" at the top of this page OR "C34 Home Page" scroll to bottom of the page for "manuals."
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Stu Jackson, C34 IA Secretary, #224 1986, "Aquavite"  Cowichan Bay, BC  Maple Bay Marina  SR/FK, M25, Rocna 10 (22#) (NZ model)

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Jim Hardesty

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Re: in-mast furling and boom adjustment
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2009, 06:59:42 AM »

Aaron,
I have a 2001 and my car has 4 round plastic sliders.  I use lots of McLube on it.  It doesn't slide real free but doesn't stick looks like new.  Sometimes during light air I over tighten the outhual then ease or just reach up and pull back on the car to get the main trimmed a little better. 
I'm not sure this is the best way but it works best for me to roll the main in and out.  I use the topping lift with a shock cord that supports the boom about level.  I stear off the wind about 20 deg. ease the main halyard and main sheet and release the vang, then deploy the main sometimes a little help is needed with the winch to get the main started.  Then trim the main.  Sometimes need to use the winch to roll it in.
I think that there must be a better way.  Hate to say it but the Hunters mains seem to work better.
Jim
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Jim Hardesty
2001 MKII hull #1570 M35BC  "Shamrock"
sailing Lake Erie
from Commodore Perry Yacht Club
Erie, PA

tonywright

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Re: in-mast furling and boom adjustment
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2009, 07:50:41 AM »

Jim, I don't have to do anything like that. I just steer head to wind and pull the main out, then release the mainsheet. If there is a gusty wind I have to hold it back with the furling line so the sail doesn't roll out too fast. Furling is just as easy: go head to wind, center the traveller, ease the vang,  and pull it in by hand. I never have to play with the halyard etc.

I believe that you can have problems if there is any kind of wind pressure in the sail, or if the vang is too tight.

Tony

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Tony Wright
#1657 2003 34 MKII  "Vagabond"
Nepean Sailing Club, Ottawa, Canada
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