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Author Topic: Propane Regulators  (Read 7359 times)

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reedbr

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Propane Regulators
« on: April 23, 2009, 11:15:29 PM »

Has anybody replaced their propane regulator?  I'm looking for the flow specs.  I bought a Mr. Heater low pressure regulator to replace my bad one.  It is rated at 75,000 BTU at 1/2 psi output.  I assume since 1/2 psi is the residential natural gas line pressure that it is right for my propane system, but it would be nice to get some confirmation.  I couldn't find any specs on the Seaward Princess stove except that it has two 7K BTU burners and a 10K BTU oven.  I couldn't find any specs on the old regulator either.  I did see a 10psi output regulator on the shelf near the one I got, but that only seemed appropriate as the first stage of a two stage system.  The other BBQ grill regulators were rated for 10K BTU and didn't list output pressure ratings.

Also, the nose o-ring on my tank connector was showing cracks so I replaced the whole connector.  I'll have to put that on my list of annual checks. 

Lastly, my 1996 aluminum tank is now over 12 years old, requiring recertification or replacement to refill.  If anybody in the upper Chesapeake area needs this done. United Propane in Millersville, Maryland said they can do it.  New 10# aluminum tanks are $250, ouch.

OK, really last question: My gauge reads 30-300 psi.  What pressure is full and what is empty?  I've got 95 psi in my current tank and wonder if that over half full or not.
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Brian Reed
1997 C34 mkII "Ambitious"
St. Mary's River, MD

Steve Sayian

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Re: Propane Regulators
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2009, 12:46:34 AM »

Brian,

Last summer mine gave out while on vacation on Martha's Vineyard.  I bought a new one at West marine for the ridiculous price of $70.00.  Came in a package and was for propane tanks.  Had several fittings and a guage for tank status.  It was the same as the OEM that failed.
When I got home, I checked the local hardware store and could have gotten the same thing for about $20.00...

Steve
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Steve Sayian
"Ocean Rose"
1999 Mk II
Wing, Std Rig, Kiwi Prop
#1448, Hingham, Mass

Ron Hill

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Re: Propane Regulators
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2009, 07:00:22 PM »

Brian : Go to any marine chanderlary and get the best price.  They will have the right psi regulator.  I got mine at Faucets in Annapolis. 
The best way to determine the capacity left in a propane tank is to weigh it, not look at the psi.  Most any propane dealer will weigh your tank and tell you what's remaining.  They'll also top it off without charging you the price of filling an empty tank. 
Just ask them if they only charge for the amount of the gas (lbs) refilled.  If they don't look for another dealer.   
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Ron, Apache #788

reedbr

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Re: Propane Regulators
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2009, 09:57:53 PM »

Update to close the loop, the stock Mr. Heater single stage propane regulator from Home Depot worked.   It was under $20.  It had the same ports as the original 1997 stock regulator so no replumbing was necessary.  The single stage regulator is just like a BBQ grill regulator, but this one provided more flow for the 24K BTU max stock stove. I tested it for about 5 minutes with both burners on high but I didn't test the oven. 

Also, I discovered that "first stage", "high pressure", and red or red-capped regulators are all the same thing.  They are designed for a residential style system with separate first and second stage regulators.  The first stage takes tank pressure to 10 psi, and a second stage takes it down to 1/2 psi (or equivalent water column) which seems to be what appliances require.  The single stage regulator does both stages in one unit and is what I needed.

My only concern is if the clearcoat on this unit will hold up as well as the painted stock unit did.  Both old and new units are aluminum bodies.

Tank pressure was about 100psi on a 75 degree day and was about 3/4 full by weight.  Earlier I had it at 95 psi but air temps were almost 20 degrees lower.

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Brian Reed
1997 C34 mkII "Ambitious"
St. Mary's River, MD

Ron Hill

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Re: Propane Regulators
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2009, 06:38:58 PM »

Brian : Your PSI sounds about right. 
As You said the PSI changes with the temperature, that's why I said to weigh the bottle as that weight stays the same regardless of temperature !!! 
The propane is put into the bottle in a liquid state and then vaporizes to fill the line to the stove.   
A thought
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Ron, Apache #788

reedbr

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Re: Propane Regulators
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2009, 06:29:51 AM »

I don't carry bathroom scale on the boat.  I do carry an adapter so I can use my BBQ grill portable cylinder for my stove when I do run out.  It works great.
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Brian Reed
1997 C34 mkII "Ambitious"
St. Mary's River, MD

Ken Juul

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Re: Propane Regulators
« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2009, 09:06:17 AM »

I'm not a fisherman, but I've heard of using a fish scale to weigh the tank.  Tie a cord between the bottle handles, hook the scale between and lift the bottle with the scale.
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Ken & Vicki Juul
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Chesapeake Bay
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