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Author Topic: Atlantic Crossing  (Read 511 times)

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weseitz

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Atlantic Crossing
« on: July 17, 2020, 08:28:51 AM »

What do you think of sailing a 1998 C34 MKII across the Atlantic from Cape Verde or Grand Canaries to the Florida Keys? It would happen in the last half of October/early November. Assume all relatively new safety equipment, daily wind frequent wind updates and route recommendations from Commanders, AIS, Radar, etc. I'm particularly interested in opinions about the strength of the boat to make such a journey. What Beaufort Force level was the C34 MKII designed to withstand? Your comments are welcome.
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Stu Jackson

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2020, 11:07:25 AM »

Bill, you might be interested in Steve's observations here:

https://c34.org/bbs/index.php/topic,5270.0.html

Others have sailed from the Great Lakes through the Erie Canal and down to the Bahamas.

Those are the longest voyages I know of, other than my trip from SF to here in BC, but that was all motoring and harbor hopping up the coast.  https://c34.org/bbs/index.php/topic,9157.0.html

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Stu Jackson, C34 IA Secretary, #224 1986, "Aquavite"  Cowichan Bay, BC  Maple Bay Marina  SR/FK, M25, Rocna 10 (22#) (NZ model)

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Noah

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2020, 11:29:23 AM »

Two C34 voyagers that come to mind and are worth a read:
One LA to Hawaii singlehanded
One NYC to Bermuda RT
I also heard one sailed to Australia? But maybe a rumor.

http://www.sailinghaunani.com/

http://www.wesail.com/fullmoon.html
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1990 hull #1014, San Diego, CA,  Fin Keel,
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Jon W

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2020, 12:49:42 PM »

Who sailed it to the islands off the coast of Africa?
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Jon W.
s/v Della Jean
Hull #493, 1987 MK 1, M25XP, Manson Supreme 35
San Diego, Ca

Patches

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2020, 02:13:05 PM »

I remember reading somewhere-can't remember now--that Catalina Yachts delivered some new C-34 boats to England/Europe by sailing them over there.
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Jim Hardesty

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2020, 03:18:54 PM »

Quote
What do you think of sailing a 1998 C34 MKII across the Atlantic from Cape Verde or Grand Canaries to the Florida Keys?

Interesting.  If I'm not mistaken that was the route of the Spanish Galleons. Arrrr.  My questions are what are you doing for self steering and down wind sails?  How many on your crew?
 FWIW Was a sailor in Erie building a "boat" to do that same crossing.  He was attempting the Guinness record for smallest vessel crossing Atlantic, wasn't much bigger than an oil drum.  He did a couple of failed attempts that didn't last very long.  Don't know where that project stands now.
Lots of luck and please keep us posted.
Jim
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Jim Hardesty
2001 MKII hull #1570 M35BC  "Shamrock"
sailing Lake Erie
from Commodore Perry Yacht Club
Erie, PA

Ron Hill

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2020, 03:31:17 PM »

Wes : I'd definitely look at the weather history in that part of the Atlantic at that time of year!!

I could be wrong, but I seriously doubt that Catalina sailed their European deliveries across the Atlantic. 
The only Catalina ocean going that I know of is the C27 that Catalina supported that sailed around the world!

A thought
« Last Edit: July 17, 2020, 04:39:46 PM by Ron Hill »
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Kyle Ewing

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2020, 08:11:49 PM »

I've read a lot about bluewater boats and sailing across oceans--I want to do it one of these years--and it seems to come down to risk management.  I think the C34 would make it under most conditions but not sure about extremes.

Here are some thoughts on the Catalina 34: https://c34.org/faq-pages/faq-offshore.html

An interesting article on ARC failures: https://www.yachtingworld.com/sailing-across-atlantic/what-are-the-most-common-repairs-at-sea-for-yachts-sailing-across-the-atlantic-arc-survey-results-tell-all-109688

Check out the conditions this guy sails in:
https://www.youtube.com/c/ErikAanderaa. Do you accept the risk of being there in a Catalina 34, for days?

Christian Williams took an Ericson 32 to Hawaii and back solo.  The Ericson 32 seems to have similar stability and other measures as the Catalina 34: https://youtu.be/28TAdDu5L6U

At least one owner mounted a Hydrovane on a Catalina 34mk 2: https://hydrovane.com/stories/catalina-34/catalina-34-extended-custom-a/

It seems like one 24-48 hour storm would put the same wear and tear on the boat as years of coastal sailing.  I think about all the leaks, repairs and breakages I've had over the years happening during one crossing without outside assistance.

I've done several Chicago Mac races (333 miles non-stop) including 10'+ Lake Michigan waves (very steep)and one 70+ knot storm that disabled several boats.  My Catalina 34 performed great, however the bad weather lasted hours, not days.  This is roughly 10% of the ARC or Transpac.

Keep us posted on what you decide.  Where is your boat now?







 






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Kyle Ewing
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Stu Jackson

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2020, 09:05:41 PM »

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
 I think about all the leaks, repairs and breakages I've had over the years happening during one crossing without outside assistance.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Take a look at our fixed portlights.  Think about it.  Weak link in the chain.
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Stu Jackson, C34 IA Secretary, #224 1986, "Aquavite"  Cowichan Bay, BC  Maple Bay Marina  SR/FK, M25, Rocna 10 (22#) (NZ model)

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Noah

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2020, 09:16:17 PM »

Plywood.
To quote someone: "There is no problem so great that it can't be solved."
 8)
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Bob K

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #10 on: July 18, 2020, 07:26:19 AM »

Wow. During hurricane season?  Aside from the obvious dangers, would you even be able to get anyone to insure you?
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Bob K
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Northern Chesapeake Bay

weseitz

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #11 on: July 19, 2020, 01:36:39 AM »

I want to thank everyone for their comments. Very thoughtful and much appreciated. I will check out the links and give thought to the comments.

This C34 was built in 1998 (#1423), and delivered in Maryland. In 2008, a Swedish diplomat, working in WDC, bought it and eventually had it transported to Gothenburg Sweden. I think itís the only Catalina in Sweden. I want to get it back to Sarasota FL where I live, and Iím contemplating transport by cargo ship again or sailing across the Atlantic. Transport costs $15,000. I could add equipment for that money.

Iíve sailed it in the North Atlantic in 40 knot winds and 10 ft seas (not by choice) and it held up well. Thatís why I think it might make the crossing. The question is the seaworthiness. Here is a EU rating system that discusses the worthiness of boats in various conditions. How would you all rate aC34? Iím interested in having comments from others with more experience with C34s than me.

CE CLASS A yachts are designed for large sea voyages (everywhere), in which wind force may exceed 8 on the scale of BEAUFORT and waves can also exceed a significant height of 4 meters. These yachts are designed largely to be self-sufficient in this rather hostile environment. CAREFUL, in most cases, this is only theoretical.
CE CLASS B yachts are designed to travel off the coast (200 miles or less) in which the winds can be up to force 8 (not exceeding) and waves can reach a height up to 4 meters (not exceeding).
CE CLASS C boats are designed for travel close to the coasts and in large bays, estuaries, lakes and rivers in which winds can be up to force 6 (not exceeding) and waves may reach a height of 2 meters (not exceeding).
CE CLASS D boats are designed for cruises in protected waters, like small lakes, rivers and canals in which the winds can be up to force 4 and waves can reach a height up to 0.30 meter (less than 1 foot).
The rules of CE certification for construction and sale of boats are designed to assess the structural strength and integrity of essential parts of the hull, the reliability, and function of propulsion, steering systems, power generation and all other features installed on board to help ensure the key essential services of the yacht.

Thanks again for your comments.

Bill
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scgunner

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #12 on: July 19, 2020, 08:33:12 AM »

I'm not a bluewater sailor and it doesn't sound like you are either, not to say you can't become one, but the first thing I'd do is establish your primary goal. What is it exactly you want to do, get this particular boat to Florida, make an Atlantic crossing, find the cheapest way to get the boat to Florida, it will help define your plan of action.

The first thing I'd do is talk to a lot of people and do a lot of homework. You may find that three months to get ready for this type of voyage just isn't going to be enough time, and even if you are ready in time, as Bob say you'll be sailing right into hurricane season.

You do have other options, for example I'd imagine you could hire an experienced bluewater crew to deliver the boat for a lot less than $15,000. Another option, if you like the C34 and want one in Florida why not just sell this boat and buy one in Florida?
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Kevin Quistberg                                                 Top Gun 1987 Mk 1 Hull #273

glennd3

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #13 on: July 19, 2020, 11:04:48 AM »

I too do not understand the need to bring this boat over with the cost and risks involved. I guess if you want to do it because it is some kind of life event that you could do it as a great thing you did in your life. Maybe on your grave stone you could put " I sailed my Catalina 34 across the Atlantic during hurricane season and made it!".
I'm not a bluewater sailor and it doesn't sound like you are either, not to say you can't become one, but the first thing I'd do is establish your primary goal. What is it exactly you want to do, get this particular boat to Florida, make an Atlantic crossing, find the cheapest way to get the boat to Florida, it will help define your plan of action.

The first thing I'd do is talk to a lot of people and do a lot of homework. You may find that three months to get ready for this type of voyage just isn't going to be enough time, and even if you are ready in time, as Bob say you'll be sailing right into hurricane season.

You do have other options, for example I'd imagine you could hire an experienced bluewater crew to deliver the boat for a lot less than $15,000. Another option, if you like the C34 and want one in Florida why not just sell this boat and buy one in Florida?
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Glenn Davis
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Chesapeake Bay Maryland

Noah

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Re: Atlantic Crossing
« Reply #14 on: July 19, 2020, 12:40:13 PM »

Not condoning it, but I believe the best weather window/month to leave Europe and ride South Atlantic trades East to West to Caribbean and South America is November. Still may have some storm chances however.
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