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Author Topic: Electrical Connection Grease  (Read 2894 times)

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KWKloeber

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Re: Electrical Connection Grease
« Reply #15 on: December 31, 2016, 12:17:47 PM »

Stu,

I don't understand what you're suggesting re: #2? 
Heat shrinking over a battery terminal stud/nut (wouldn't that be impossible due to the large cable lug?) or over a stud on a terminal strip or alternator stud (nearly impossible due to the ring terminal itself)? 

Slather an alt stud or battery terminals with liquid tape?  Maybe, but I wouldn't.  I previously mentioned LT but in reference to a light coating on a "permanent" out of sight/mind connection (gauge, switch terminals) behind the engine panel.  I think one exception where heat shrink could be used is to encase "in line" quick disconnects.   Or as I think we discussed on the phone that night (my time,) encasing the quick disconnect on the starter solenoid "S" wire/terminal (after removing the fuse, of course. :wink: ) if you don't have a threaded-stud type solenoid.

FWIW, I'll add CRC 06026 Heavy Duty Corrosion Inhibitor to the list of total assembly protectants (like TC-11.)  It may not be as high-tech/mil spec as others, but for our use, more economical.  I'll submit that these be used can be used on individual assemblies (#2, like terminal block studs, alt studs, engine senders, etc.) as well.

I've ordered the SuperLube 82003 connector protectant to give it a try and check the viscosity (could it be brushed on before assembly, rather than the super expensive alternatives?)

-ken
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KWKloeber

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Re: Electrical Connection Grease
« Reply #16 on: December 31, 2016, 12:20:19 PM »

Engineers: Can't live with'em, can't live without'em... :shock: :abd: 8)

Noah, There's left-cost and right-coast engineers!!!   :rolling :wink: :roll: :shock:

kk
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Twenty years from now you'll be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did.
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Stu Jackson

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Re: Electrical Connection Grease
« Reply #17 on: December 31, 2016, 12:26:52 PM »

Stu,

I don't understand what you're suggesting re: #2? 
Heat shrinking over a battery terminal stud/nut (wouldn't that be impossible due to the large cable lug?) or over a stud on a terminal strip or alternator stud (nearly impossible due to the ring terminal itself)? 

Nope, c'mon.  Part of #2 is wires into connectors, like butt connectors or even wires into battery lugs.  That's all.
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KWKloeber

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Re: Electrical Connection Grease
« Reply #18 on: December 31, 2016, 08:59:23 PM »

Stu,

I don't understand what you're suggesting re: #2? 
Heat shrinking over a battery terminal stud/nut (wouldn't that be impossible due to the large cable lug?) or over a stud on a terminal strip or alternator stud (nearly impossible due to the ring terminal itself)? 

Nope, c'mon.  Part of #2 is wires into connectors, like butt connectors or even wires into battery lugs.  That's all.

Stu

I see the confusion! 

His discussion of 1,2,3 was specifically (only) the physical terminal, post, or pin connections -- not the wire or cable crimp itself.   Previous clarified that it didn't apply to the crimp, which shouldn't have any dielectric or other goop applied before crimping w/ adhesive heat shrink terminals.  :thumb:
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J_Sail

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Re: Electrical Connection Grease
« Reply #19 on: January 03, 2017, 09:43:32 PM »

There isn't any particular harm in putting a thin layer of contact lube or grease on a wire prior to crimping, but it is not necessary. The idea of crimping is that the pressure forms what's called a "gas-tight" seal in the contact area, which protects it from corrosion where it matters.  Corrosion outside of that area, while unsightly, doesn't interfere with the connection.

By the way, NO-OX-ID is not actually conductive; it's one of those products where the company decided to (mis)describe it as conductive to better appeal to consumers, who would otherwise worry about putting non-conductive grease on electric contacts. It is no more or less conductive than typical dielectric greases. It's all about the fact that in the actual contact area, the microscopic peaks of the contact press through the grease to allow electricity to flow.

« Last Edit: January 08, 2017, 09:00:02 PM by J_Sail »
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Jeff Kaplan

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Re: Electrical Connection Grease
« Reply #20 on: January 07, 2017, 11:54:41 AM »

Dialectric greese is definitely what to use.  I have sold the product into the trucking market for years, mechanics use it on all connections. It is water proof and does let the current thru.  Several brands are in the market, and can be purchased at local auto and truck parts stores.  Look for brand by CRC, Trucklite, Grote, I've sold CRC for years. Can be bought in cheese whiz style cans with nozzle of just canned, applied with small brush. Just make sure can states dialectric greese.
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KWKloeber

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Re: Electrical Connection Grease
« Reply #21 on: January 07, 2017, 09:19:55 PM »

J_

I got a reply from SuperLube re the difference between their dielectric grease and gel contact corrosion preventer.  to wit:

Ken,
Our part number 91003 is our super LubeŽ Silicone Dielectric Grease and part number 82003 is our Anti-Corrosion Gel. I have listed some differences.

The grease is much thicker than the gel.
The grease uses silicone oil as its base oil, whereas the gel uses a blend of mineral oil and PAO oil.
There is a higher concentration of anti-corrosion additives in the gel.
The gel has been tested and approved by Thermo-King for their electrical connectors on refrigerated trailers to reduce road salt corrosion and fretting. (see attached link)

http://www.super-lube.com/files/pdfs/Connector_Gel.pdf

I have attached a few links for your review.
http://www.super-lube.com/files/pdfs/silicone_dielectric_grease_technical_bulletin.pdf
http://www.super-lube.com/files/pdfs/Technical_Bulletin_Anti-Corrosion_&_Connector_Gel.pdf


FWIW I got in my tube of (ptfe-free) connector gel and it's pretty similar to the SL ptfe lube.  It could probably be brushed on with, say, a flux brush, especially if warmed a titch.

I had said "....the crimp, which shouldn't have any dielectric or other goop applied (my interjection, not your words) before crimping w/ adhesive heat shrink terminals," because -- it's just the *best choice* for the average DIYer to avoid it -- not unlike soldering and as you say silicone in the toolbox.  Getting any dielectric on the insulation, either through handling or squishing out while crimping, will prevent adhesion of the AHS on the terminal/butt connector.

-ken

There isn't any particular harm in putting a thin layer of contact lube or grease on a wire prior to crimping, but it is not necessary. The idea of crimping is that the pressure forms what's called a "gas-tight" seal in the contact area, which protects it from corrosion where it matters.  Corrosion outside of that area, while unsightly, doesn't interfere with the connection.

By the way, NO-OX-ID is not actually conductive; it's one of those products where the company decided to (mis)describe it as conductive to better appeal to consumers, who would otherwise worry about putting non-conductive grease on electric contacts. It is no more or less conductive than typical dialectic greases. It's all about the fact that in the actual contact area, the microscopic peaks of the contact press through the grease to allow electricity to flow.
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Twenty years from now you'll be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did.
So throw off the bowlines.  Sail away from the safe harbor.  Catch the tradewinds in your sails.
Explore.  Dream.  Discover.   -Mark Twain
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