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Author Topic: Balmar 912-75 and Universal 25xp  (Read 19646 times)

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Dave Emery

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Balmar 912-75 and Universal 25xp
« on: May 02, 2001, 08:48:03 PM »

I recently installed a Balmar 912-75 on a 1990 Catalina 34 (Universal 25XP). There are two things I need to modify to make it work. Number one was to grind a small area of the lower alternator bracket where it made contact with the fan. This was accomplished using a standard hand file and the amount of material removed was minimal. Second in order to align the belt correctly, I had to remove a small amount from the back side of the two inch foot. This allowed me to shim the alternator aft for proper belt alignment. This was acomplished using a standard hack saw. I also installed a Balmar 612 multi stage regulator. Good luck with your project the effort is worth the return.
 
 Dave Emery
 The Other Way, #988
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rdavison

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Alternator arm
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2001, 03:32:47 PM »

I'm just in the process of putting an equivalent Powertap alternator on an M35.  Same probelem with the arm.  I mounted the new alternator on the engine temporarily and used a marker to indicate the fan interference with the old arm.  Then drew a new arm with the same hole dimensions and spacing but a "deeper" curve to miss the fan.  A local welding and fabrication shop made the new arm for $80. I made it 1/4 inch thick since there was space and I wanted to overbuild it in case filing was still required.  It wasn't.
 
 Randy Davison
 
 Randy Davison  #1268 1993 k7voe
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Ken Dickson

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Alternator Arm
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2001, 09:45:41 AM »

I added exactly 1" to the curved end of the arm.  This allows for the added clearance of the larger alternator case and put the adjustment range right in the middle with the stock belt.
 
 I had a local welder do the modification for me.  He charged one dollar and it took about five minutes to do (it took  longer than that to cool it down after he was done).  
 
 If you need the tach settings just email me and I can give them to you.l
 
 Ken Dickson
 Family Affair C-34 876
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mike ingham

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Upgrade to Balmar alternator
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2001, 04:30:39 PM »

I can't comment about the Balmar mounting brackets but I do have a caution about the pulleys match between the Balmar and the M-25Xp engine.
 
 We upgraded a couple of years ago and took off for Maine shortly after the upgrade. Long story short we spent a lot of time and money in various marinas because the engine was chewing up alternator belts at a prodigious rate.
 
 It is very important that the pulley on the front of the alternator and the pulley to which the belt attaches on the engine and the belt itself are all in synch - meaning sized properly. It is equally important that the two pulleys be properly aligned one to another.
 
 Failure in either of these areas could have you chewing up a belt in 10 or 15 hours of engine time.
 
 Like so many other things in sailing there is a lot of folklore about this but trust me when I tell you that there are different sized pulleys for these Balmar alternators (in contradiction to what my marina service manager told me)and getting one that is a match to your engine and then putting on the right belt is critical.
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mitch brown

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fuel gauge
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2001, 12:50:10 PM »

I have had an inoperable fule gauge for 3 1/2 yrs . I have replaced the gauge twice, the sending unit 3 times (one from factory, two from West Marine), the wiring once, and the screws and connectors twice. Guess what??!? After working temporarily, it failed again every time. I have resigned myself to the fact that it is a better use of my time to keep track of how many hours I have run the engine after refueling, and just estimate how much fuel I have left by using the consumption rate. I know there have been many posts to this problem with someone suggesting a mechanical sending unit sold at West Marine but I am tired of removing the panels in the aft cabin to get to the tank. Good luck!!
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Stu Jackson

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Fuel Gauge NOT!
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2001, 04:23:38 PM »

B & G
 
 I agree with Mitch.  It just isn't worth the effort to keep fixing it.  Many reasons for failure, and some folks may have found a good answer, but most of us haven't.  The old Mailing List, as I recall, discovered someone who found one that worked.
 
 As long as the engine hour meter is running, you can conservatively figure 1/2 gallon per hour.  I have kept very careful track of consumption for the last two and a half years, on a spreadsheet.  We motor out for about an hour each time we sail, sometimes motor an hour or less back in at 2/3 throttle.
 
 It turns out it is actually less, and averages about 0.4 gallons per hour, or over 2.3 hours per gallon.  I usually fill up when the tank is half empty, so it's about 10 gallons a refill (23 gallon tank).
 
 Just remember to fill up every 20 engine hours or so and you never need a fuel gauge at all.
 
 Stu
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Stu Jackson, C34 IA Secretary, #224 1986, "Aquavite"  Cowichan Bay, BC  Maple Bay Marina  SR/FK, M25, Rocna 10 (22#) (NZ model)

"There is no problem so great that it can't be solved."

sailor2mon

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fuel gauge
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2001, 11:07:59 PM »

I have a 1988 c34 also and have successfully replaced the sending unit which fixed the exact problem you describe. The problem occurs because as the boat sits in a marina and you are not using fuel it is still subject to some motion. The motion causes constant rubbing on the coils in the sending unit and eventually they start to short out. The symptoms you describe is due to the unit touching the shorted spot were the contact rides on the coil in the sending unit. When I finally found a replacement at a boat store it was a fairly simple matter to change it out. You just need an adjustable universal model. I can get the name of it if you need help.
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Stu Jackson

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Rigid Vang
« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2001, 04:31:16 PM »

Yes, it is the best thing since sliced bread.
 
 It gives you the purchase you need and looks great at a fair price.
 
 Yes, diss the topping lift, what a blessing.
 
 Go for it.
 
 There were some earlier discussions on this issue.  Try the search engine under topping lifts and/or rigid vangs.
 
 Best regards,
 
 Stu
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Stu Jackson, C34 IA Secretary, #224 1986, "Aquavite"  Cowichan Bay, BC  Maple Bay Marina  SR/FK, M25, Rocna 10 (22#) (NZ model)

"There is no problem so great that it can't be solved."

Capt Al

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Hard Vang
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2001, 05:39:42 AM »

Hard Vang
 
 Yep it is me! Lets see a response from Stu, Ron and I and we all say the same positive info on the Rigged Vang.
 The only thing I have found better is the Autohelm 4000 plus.
 As Stu said "Go for it!" As Ron said "It's great and you'll find that you use the traveler less because you can reshape the main sail with the sheet line and not have the boom ride up."
 I have removed the topping lift, can see no reason for it now. I also use the vang to hold the boom above the Bimini when it is up. Now I have less wear on the Bimini edge as the boom no longer rubs it. To speed sail the bimini is down.
 Good luck! It is WORTH every penny.
 Capt Al
 #55 Kindred Spirit" (For Sale...going bigger)
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Roc

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Liquid Plumr
« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2002, 05:10:49 AM »

Ron,
 I remember Liquid Plumr came out with a product that you pour down the drain to clean out the trap and pipes.  It was a bio-type of product.  The commercial on TV showed how it naturally ate away at the 'colesterol' on the pipes.  As for holding tanks, there is a product that I use called K.O.  Can be found at WM.  There is a link on our site that talks about sanitation maintenance and the use of bio products that manage odor.
 
 Roc-
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Roc - "Sea Life" 2000 MKII #1477.  Rock Hall, MD

karista

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(No subject)
« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2002, 06:15:20 AM »

Ron
 I just replaced the fuel sender. Found it practically impossible to do it thru the Beckson port. By removing the large portside aft-cabin panel you will have easy access. I replaced the Sender with a Tempo unit which required no custom depth cutting. I believe its the 12-inch model, and has same ohm rating as the Teleflex universal sender. So far it has worked well.
 Bernd
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Red

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fuel guage sender
« Reply #11 on: September 19, 2002, 07:56:24 AM »

Ron
   Before I left for Mexico I added a second fuel tank.  I have replaced the senders in both tanks several times and still haven't figured out what the problem is. The rheostat windings appear to be damaged but I don't know why.  I contacted telefex and was told that their units were not recommended for sail boats.  Tempo may be the best bet.  
   Good luck  Russ
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Ted Pounds

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Fuel sender
« Reply #12 on: September 21, 2002, 08:04:37 PM »

Ron,
 
 I replaced mine just the way you said - take off the side panel for access and pull it out thorough the beckson port.  I got my replacement from Catalina.  It was a few years ago but as I recall it was less than $30.  It might pay to stick with Catalina parts since the old one held up for 14 years and you'll know it's the right part.
 
 Ted
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Ted Pounds
"Molly Rose"
1987 #447

Gary Wilson

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Fuel Guage
« Reply #13 on: September 22, 2002, 09:48:19 AM »

Ron,
 
 We added a new sending unit about two years ago.  We pulled the side panel off because the access port in the cockpit storage locker is too small.  We bought our sender from Catalina parts.
 
 I just have a couple of comments.  We have now added an 8" diameter PVC deck plate with pryout lid to the plywood side panel.  It is located where the fuel shutoff valve is.  It was inexpensive, easy to install and looks like it "belongs" there.  I believe we could replace the sender again without removing the panel.
 
 Also, during our last extended outing, we ran out of fuel when the guage reached 1/4 tank.  I do not know if this would have happened with the original sender, because we always like to keep the tank topped up.  I would recommend carrying an extra gallon or two of fuel before testing the lower limits of the tank capacity.
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captran

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sender and fuel guage
« Reply #14 on: September 24, 2002, 11:11:47 AM »

The sender was replaced when I purchased the boat spring01.  later that summer the guage read zilch, so I thought it was the sender again.  got a new sender from Catalina and replaced it in June 02.  Still Nada, so replaced the guage and it works.  mine is a  1997 ...and with minimal bending I could get the new sender installed.  but I had to remove the  whole face place to get the room I needed.I couldn't just unscrew the round port as it did not have enough room.  I like the idea of making a bigger access port, and if I have to do it again, will do that.  To find out if it's the guage, pick up a new guage and hook it up to the old wires.  If it works, then you know its the sender and you can take the guage back.  If the new guage doesnt work, and you have power, you know its the sender.  There must be some way to test the ohms, but I couldnt figure out how to do that without pulling the sender.  It was easier to have all the possible parts that I would need...  quite a little project. any one know the model of the other sender unit.??  I had heard there is some mechanical unit that is less prone to failure???
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