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 1 
 on: Today at 03:43:19 PM 
Started by fatamorgana - Last post by fatamorgana
Just to confirm, I know it is a festoon, I have a picture of the bulb.  And, I'm assuming it's 42mm, but would like confirmation.

 2 
 on: Today at 03:22:32 PM 
Started by fatamorgana - Last post by fatamorgana
I'm looking to replace the bulbs in my slider cabin lights (slide one direction for 1 bulb, the other for both) in my 1988 C34.  I understand they are festoon bulbs, but can anyone tell me the length?  I'm not able to get to the boat to measure right now.  I see many others that have bought replacement LED's, but I haven't seen anything that shows the length of the base.

Thanks 

 3 
 on: Today at 09:56:01 AM 
Started by Brad Young - Last post by mark_53
What we did
1) disconnected water heater
2) connected raw water oout ---> top input of fresh water pump
3) connected lower thermostat hose ---> heat exchanger (added about a foot of hose)
4) ran low rpm 2400
Seem to do ok. Temp ran between 140 --- 170

Nice work! That work around may not have been mentioned before.  If there was a "Tips and Tricks" section, that should be added.  Thanks for sharing.

 4 
 on: Today at 09:25:05 AM 
Started by Brad Young - Last post by Brad Young
We are not sure where to after La Paz.. going to keep the boat in Mexico for a few years.

 5 
 on: Today at 09:22:04 AM 
Started by Brad Young - Last post by Brad Young
What we did
1) disconnected water heater
2) connected raw water oout ---> top input of fresh water pump
3) connected lower thermostat hose ---> heat exchanger (added about a foot of hose)
4) ran low rpm 2400
Seem to do ok. Temp ran between 140 --- 170

 6 
 on: Today at 09:19:39 AM 
Started by mdidomenico - Last post by pablosgirl
Had the same problem.  I first soaked it with PB blaster then after a while I tried to work the aluminum sparser back and forth. First using a hammer then pliers.  Took a while but eventually it worked free. Cleaned up both pieces then applied Tef-gel upon reassembly to prevent future corrosion.  Your mileage may vary depending on how corroded your pieces are.

Paul

 7 
 on: Today at 07:34:40 AM 
Started by Bill Shreeves - Last post by Jim Hardesty
Roc,
I like Bill have never heard of disconnection the prop shaft.  After some thought I'm thinking that the small adjustment to the shaft packing each spring may be due to the shaft mis-aligning over the winter and not drying out as I thought before.  Now I'm interested.  Do you have to adjust your shaft packing every spring?
Jim

 8 
 on: Today at 07:01:50 AM 
Started by Bill Shreeves - Last post by Dave Spencer
Hi Roc,
Do you see any evidence that the flanges have moved when you disconnect and then haul out?  Do you haul with the mast up?  I'm sure there is some hull movement when the boat transitions from in the water to out of the water but I would think the movement would be greater when rigging tension is applied and released. Common wisdom (which is surprisingly uncommon) is that shaft alignment should be done with rigging tension applied while the boat is in the water which I have done. But, until now, I'd never heard of disconnecting the shaft for haulout or overland transportation.  Any flexing of the shaft would be minimal; especially since it's a static load and the xmsn end of the shaft is ultimately supported by flexible mounts. 
YBYC!   :D

 9 
 on: Today at 06:40:26 AM 
Started by mdidomenico - Last post by britinusa
I didn't see any cracks, but did service the dorades and vent valves.

http://www.sailingeximius.com/2017/10/oh-for-some-fresh-air.html

Paul

 10 
 on: Today at 04:18:32 AM 
Started by Bill Shreeves - Last post by Roc
If you think what's happening when the boat is out of the water and on jack stands, it does make sense to disconnect the shaft from the trans.  Out of the water, the hull is flexed, out of it's normal in water position.  We see that by noticing gaps and differences in the cabinets and door fitments.  On one end, the shaft is bolted to the trans.  On the other end it is fixed at the skeg.  If the hull is flexed, then there is pressure trying to bend the shaft.  By disconnecting the shaft at the trans, it takes that pressure off.  I disconnect my shaft every winter.  4 bolts, it only takes a few minutes. 

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